Collective Teacher Efficacy

Collective teacher efficacy continues to be either number one or two in terms of impact size on student performance, according to John Hattie.

If you’re looking for a great read, check this out.  Collective Efficacy: How Educators’ Beliefs Impact Student Learning by Jenni Anne Marie Donohoo.  Might also be a great book for a staff book study.  Or a summer read.  The cool thing about teacher efficacy is that it’s not about any specific program.  It’s simply a strong and pervasive belief that working as a team, teachers can do great things with kids.  

Obviously Hattie continues to rank all kinds of stuff.  If I remember correctly, anything with a .40 effect size and above is considered impactful.  Collective teacher efficacy has an effect size of 1.57. Student mental health, specifically depression, continues to be dead bang last, with an actual negative effect size of -.42.  By the way, RTI is considered a ‘Super Factor’, just like Collective Teacher Efficacy.  It has an effect size of 1.07. And we have good RTI work going on all over the place.  Coupling that with collective teacher efficacy, for example, can really have a powerful and positive effect on kids.

“When a school staff shares the belief that through their collective actions they can positively influence student outcomes, student achievement increases. Collective teacher efficacy deserves the attention of every educator because it was recently ranked as the number one factor influencing student achievement (Hattie, 2016). Educators with high efficacy show greater effort and persistence, a willingness to try new teaching approaches, and attend more closely to the needs of students who are not progressing well. They also convey high expectations, foster learner autonomy, and welcome increased parental involvement. In addition, educators who share a sense of collective efficacy get students to believe they can excel in school.”

“Collective teacher efficacy (d = 1.57). This is a factor that can be manipulated at a whole school level. It involves helping all teachers on the staff to understand that the way they go about their work has a significant impact on student results – for better or worse. Simultaneously, it involves stopping them from using other factors (e.g. home life, socio-economic status, motivation) as an excuse for poor progress. Yes, these factors hinder learning, but a great teacher will always try to make a difference despite this, and they often succeed.”

I suppose one good question to ask ourselves as leaders is, “Do the educators at our place believe that our collective actions can positively influence student outcomes and increase student achievement?”

Author: Jeff Nelson

Jeff Nelson Fife School District Assistant Superintendent:Teaching-Learning-Innovation 36 years as an educator. 16 years teacher 3 years assistant principal 12 years principal 5 years Assistant Superintendent BA, Washington State University MAEd, Washington State University Previous member of AWSP Legislative Committee Previous member of UW Tacoma PEAB, Administrative Certification Established and maintained Fife’s first website for 7 years Present work includes establishing the first Teaching/Learning/Innovation department in the Fife School District. Examples of responsibilities include: teacher/administrator professional development, assessment, TPEP, curriculum/materials review, 24 credit requirement, technology levy leadership, teacher/administrator bargaining. Initiatives underway in Fife, as a result of new TLI Department: AVID, OER, Curriculum and Materials reviews, Student Perception Pilot with CSTP, Google Expedition Cofounder of Educational Internet Communications, LLC. Marketed and sold one of the first online grade checking programs in the US. Consulted with Seattle Educational Internet Company for 2 years. jnelson@fifeschools.com twitter.com/jeffnelsonTLI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s