Ten tips for new teachers!

Had I known then what I know now…

The fellow above, in the swell yellow belt, matching the swell yellow walls, is a first year teacher, hired in December, 1984. He was interviewed as the kids were heading out to break, and stepped into a middle school classroom, in January, 1985. That’s me. I’ve learned a lot since those first days. I thought I’d share Ten Tips for New Teachers (or old ones). I’ve lived and learned each of these lessons personally and professionally. They are in no particular order.

  1. Be yourself in class. Kids can spot a phony a mile away. I used to say, “The best teachers are themselves inside and outside of the classroom, with slightly less profanity.” I’m sure I’d say that same thing now, with more sophistication.
  2. The theory of Don’t Smile Until Christmas is crap. Err….garbage, excuse me. See number one. I recently saw a tweet from a new teacher asking about the line between ‘rapport’ and ‘classroom management’. I don’t think there is a line. Rapport and classroom management are about relationships. And falsely waiting until some date to smile is dumb. George Couros says, ” 50 years ago, relationships were the most important thing in education, and 50 years from now, it will be even more so; you can get great content anywhere.  The human connection is something that we will always need.”
  3. Speaking of Twitter. Get a twitter account. You can fill your professional life with smart people, talking about school stuff that you want to know more about. It’s like a big convention with friendly people everywhere, all wanting to share, learn, and grow with you. I would have killed to have twitter as a new teacher.
  4. You’re going to cry as a new teacher. Nobody told me how many funerals a teacher would attend. Horrible things happen to kids and colleagues. I’m not sure what I would have done with this information ahead of time, but it’s true. You are going to cry as a teacher.
  5. Go to kids’ events. It means the world to them. They love seeing you there. They are more than just your students and you can be more than just their teacher.
  6. Find a good friend on your staff with whom to dream and play. This is a biggie. My friend was another new teacher named Dave. We spent 33 years together, before he retired. We built, laughed, cried, shared, challenged, grew, played, and had the best times together. I can’t imagine my career without that guy. A positive, awesome teacher.
  7. Kind of along the lines of number 6. Don’t hang out with or pay attention to toxic and negative colleagues. They’re not your colleagues. They are jealous of what you are bringing to the table, because they can’t, won’t, don’t want to, or never did. And your excitement and enthusiasm makes them feel guilty and embarrassed.
  8. Read. Write. Read. Write. Especially write. Your brain and your skills will thank you. As will your students and colleagues. Start a blog. Even if nobody ever reads it, the act of writing will help you be a better teacher. And always be reading something.
  9. Visit other teachers’ classrooms. Some of your best resources and ideas are just around the corner. We are too isolated sometimes. Although, again as George Couros says, “Isolation is now a choice educators make.” Choose otherwise.
  10. Laugh with kids. I did save this one for last on purpose. Laughing with kids is one of the very best things you can do in your classroom. Kids will remember forever the fun times you had in class. You establish a class atmosphere when you can laugh with kids. Funny stuff happens. Let it happen.

Have a wonderful 2019 colleagues!

6 Replies to “Ten tips for new teachers!”

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