On which Cs are we sailing?

It has happened again. I start reading a new book and a single sentence just hits me. I’m reading Take the L.E.A.P. Ignite a Culture of Innovation by Elisabeth Bostwick.

I hit this early section in the book.

The Cs.

We have spent a ton of time thinking, talking, and working with the traditional 4 Cs. Collaboration, Creativity, Communication, and Critical Thinking. I hadn’t thought about some of the other Cs until I saw this in Elisabeth’s writing. Compliance, control, and conformity. So my wheels started turning. On which Cs do we set sail?

So I decided to even the Cs up and think on them a bit more. On the positive C side, I added Curiosity. On the rough C side, I added Confined and Closemouthed.

And now I’m thinking about on which Cs we primarily sail. We did a walkthrough at our high school yesterday.

Mr. Chapman’s AVID class!

When we do our walkthroughs, we use Jenni Donohoo’s protocol. We talk about what we saw, what we didn’t see, what we wonder about, and on what we think the school is working. Then the building leaders share insight and comments. We had a good conversation about the potential tension between a uniform note taking strategy, which flows primarily from lecture, and the desire to have kids collaborate. The general conclusion was that a good teacher has a variety of tools in her/his tool belt. Lecture and notes are inherently bad. Unless that’s all that happens in classroom.

A question I have is, and we’ve discussed this a lot recently, do we think about opportunities, when building our lessons/experiences for kids, to have kids collaborate, create, critically think, communicate, and use curiosity? Or do we fall into the Cs of compliance, control, conformity, confined, and closemouthed. I don’t think those latter Cs should be a part of any tool belt. Got to be honest though, we still see those Cs as part of a kid’s daily life. And I don’t think they’re by design. I think they’re by default.

Bostwick talks about her own son’s experience, where he is beginning to disengage from school. Where the 3 Cs she describes, Compliance, Control, and Conformity are in full vigor, his natural curiosity is being diminished. “Nolan’s teacher was not intentionally doing anything wrong. Simply put, she was teaching the way she had been taught through her own experiences as a child or how she learned to teach. Our experiences influence the way we approach our respective roles as educators. His teacher was caring and seemed to desire to ensure all the content was covered. What happened as a result occurs in classrooms across the nation: When our attention becomes hyperfocused on content, assessments, and management, we lose touch with what matters most—the learners’ voice.”

We will soon be meeting with all of our teachers as we celebrate one year of our 1:1 Chromebook rollout. This reading will impact that celebration and conversation as we’ll continue to model, encourage, and support teachers venturing further on the high Cs, leaving the behind the old Cs.

Looks like Dave Burgess has another potential Pirate metaphor! It’s a Pirate’s Life on the High Cs!

Ahoy!

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