I’m enjoying feeling nervous.

In two days, we will be welcoming George Couros to our district. Anyone who has ever glanced at this blog or many of my tweets will know that I generally become a star-struck teenager when I talk about George. His writing and thinking have changed the course of my career. Period. I cannot wait to have him meet, work, and talk with our amazing educators.

Prior to our gathering with George, we have a full morning of professional learning opportunities from many of the aforementioned amazing educators. Couros said, “Do you know who teachers tend to listen to?  Other teachers. If we are open to learning with and from others, we will realize and value the wisdom that exists in all of our schools.  The experts in education might be on the other side of the world, but they are for sure down the hallway. We need to tap into one another.”

We are tapping into one another with full vigor. But let’s face it. It takes guts to stand up in front of your peers and share. Kids are way easier. I am so appreciative and thankful for the great response we got from our teachers willing to step forward and lead learning with each other.

But I’m also a little nervous. And I’m enjoying being a little nervous. Our Teaching-Learning-Innovation department will also be presenting in full force, with multiple sessions. And I’ll be doing 3 of those sessions. Two on taking the plunge into twitter and one on using tweetdeck for twitter chats. I love the little graphic below.

Twitter has also changed, enriched, and amplified my thinking and career. I’ve seen tweets from educators saying that twitter saved their career. That’s a pretty amazing statement, and I can’t wait to help anyone interested get going in the twitter learning world!

It’s so simple to grow and learn.

Yesterday I spent some time at our primary school, grades Preschool-1st. We’re building a new elementary school in our district and our architects were meeting with our amazing teachers to get insight and feedback on design.

As I was waiting between groups, I saw this beautiful exchange between two kids.

“Will you help me tie my shoe?”

“Sure.”

That was the entirety of the exchange. Can you help me? Sure. Bam. Into shoe tying position they went, with the little girl paying absolute attention so she could learn.

A beautiful example of helping.

This exchange between kids was so simple and sweet. One kid needed help and asked for it. Without hesitation the other kid gave the help.

Reminds me of a couple of things. I remember when our own kids were little. The rules for playing with another kid were also simple. You’re a kid, I’m a kid, let’s play. Reminds me of the George Couros’ line, “If students leave school less curious than when they started, we have failed them.”

Made me wonder where the willingness to ask for help in learning goes sometimes. Maybe not even ask for help in learning. Maybe just being open and willing to continue to grow and learn.

Anyway, as I had the chance to share this beautiful picture, the reaction was identical. Colleagues were moved. And it’s what moves us that I’m calling out. A simple request for help. And immediate support offered.

If an educator leaves a career less curious than when they started, we have failed.

Will you help me tie my shoe?